It’s been months since I’ve worked out at the gym.

And despite the sweat dripping down my cheeks and my muscles aching, I’m happy because I’m finally working out again. 

For the longest time, I had wanted to but didn’t because based on all the googling I had done, the average gym membership price in Vietnam was $100 a month. Had I had the money, I would’ve went — going to the gym everyday justifies the cost of it — but I couldn’t afford it.

It was only after months of wanting to get back into shape when I finally decided going to the gym was something I had to do; I’d rather sacrifice something else so that I could pay for it.

By the time I arrived at the gym and spoke with the gym membership consultant, I realized I’d been wrong this entire time.

The gym membership at its off-peak hours came out to be only $26 a month.

I wish I hadn’t assumed.

The Thing About Assumptions & Why We Shouldn’t

The moment an assumption is made, all other alternatives cease to exist; we limit ourselves to only the outcome we’ve decided on.

And when that happens, a possible relationship will become a missed encounter, business transactions a lost opportunity and goals nothing more than dreams.

There’s a quote out there that goes something like this:

“If you don’t try, you’ll never know.
If you don’t go after what you want, you’ll never get it.
And if you never ask, the answer will always be no.”

When I started writing 3 years ago, I knew I was going to be terrible at it.
But I did it anyways, with no expectations, because I was only writing for myself.

Had I written for any other purpose, I would’ve likely assumed nobody would want to read what I’ve written and I would’ve never become a writer.

Assumptions are the bane of progress. They hinder creativity, deny us of our successes and limit us to one perspective.

They are our greatest enemy.

I wish I hadn’t assumed.