I felt nervous as I waited. It’s been over a year since my friend and I have really talked other than the obligatory greetings we’d texted each other on the holidays.

I worry because quite often than not, I’d lost friends from not texting often, from a lack of communication; it’s a con of living halfway around the world away from those you know.

And what I noticed about these kinds of friendships is that they’re often replaced with awkward silences, forced smiles, and secret glances at the time — all key indicators of two uncomfortable strangers pretending to be the old buddies they once were.

But I realized I’ve worried for nothing.

My friend and I hit it off again, immediately. She’s genuinely interested about my life — she asks me what I’m up to, what I’m going through, how I’m feeling. She takes me on a 45 minute drive to the countryside, to one of Bangkok’s best hidden-gem restaurants for some authentic Thai food. We talk for hours about food, culture, travel, our deepest fears, our desires and the struggles that come with it.

Reconnecting with my friend has made me realize that friendships, at least the true ones, aren’t split by time. You don’t have to constantly force interaction to maintain closeness. True friends will forever be there for you, because they understand that life sometimes gets in the way and we’re too busy to respond at the moment.

So don’t worry if you feel like you’re not talking often with your friends; it really doesn’t matter. What matters more is who that friend is, who can withstand the test of time and distance.